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1989-90 NBA Hoops Basketball Cards -1 Pack / 15 Cards

1989-90 NBA Hoops Basketball Cards - 1 pack / 15 cards 

Prior to 1989, the market for NBA trading cards was limited to a single set produced by Fleer. The popularity of the Fleer sets were minimal, even though the cards had a similar look and feel to the 1989-90 NBA Hoops cards. The reason the 89-90 NBA Hoops cards have become a landmark basketball set boils down to several key attributes that made the cards unique for it’s time. 1989-90 Hoops Michael Jordan Card

 

1) The Rookie Card. In the late 1980’s the market for sports cards in general shifted from collectors going after veteran players – to chasing the hot young player. Every collector from that day remembers the likes of Greg Jeffries, Jose Canseco, and Ken Griffey Jr.  Prior to 1989-90 Hoops, basketball card collectors had to wait sometimes several years for a “rookie card” to appear of their favourite player. For example NBA Hall of Famer James Worthy has a rookie card in 1986-87 Fleer even though he was drafted by the Lakers in 1982.  While David Robinson was drafted #1 in the 1987 NBA Draft, he did not play in the NBA until 1989 because he was serving his two-year commitment to the Navy. Robinson was considered the next big thing in basketball during that time. Big men were more of a focal point in NBA offenses back in those days – and Robinson was considered a cornerstone type player. Shortly after the product came out, Robinson rookie cards were selling for $10-20 in hobby stores and shows across America. While that seems like a piddly sum today – $10-20 was a lot to spend on a trading card. Pack prices started at $.50 cents per pack – but quickly got as high as $2 per pack.  According to the  Pittsburgh Post Gazette– the set price at some stores got as high as $100.

2) Marketing.  The NBA Hoops set was a team of people led by the NBA. Think of it this way, imagine if the “MLB” came out with their own set of cards today – competing against the baseball card giant themselves, Topps. The NBA took it upon themselves to market the cards during events like All-Star Weekend. But there was plenty of help for the NBA to market and produce the 89-90 NBA Hoops cards. The league teamed with Cardco Inc. and the Liggett Group in what proved to be a crucial strategic move.  Liggett at the time was having wild success producing Pro Set Football cards.  Liggett also was involved in distributing candy and tobacco products to retail stores across the country. This partnership proved key, as Liggett made sure that cards could easily be found in just about every grocery store in the United States during the early 1990’s.

3) Cards got hot. In the early 1990’s sports card collecting got hot. In the same vein, so did the NBA, as Michael Jordan became the most popular athlete in the world. But the popularity of sports cards stretched across all three major U.S. sports, football, baseball and basketball. The 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey Jr. rookie card set off a frenzy, and even to this day that card can still bring $25-40. Cards were affordable in those days, as typically $.50-$1.00 could get you a pack of cards. With no eBay or frankly, the internet – typically collectors actually “collected” these cards in boxes or binders and treasured the cards like gold.

1989-90 NBA Hoops
Error & Sp Cards

115a Spud Webb ERR – Says Spud signed 9/27/89 on back of card.
115b Spud Webb COR – Corrected that he signed 9/26/85 on back.
Market: The error version of this card is considered more rare and thus more valuable.

123a Don Chaney C ERR – On card back – a black line is next to the words ‘NBA coaching record’
123b Don Chaney C COR – No Line on back
Market: It’s believed both have about equal print runs.

171a John MacLeod C SP ERR – NBA logo on his photo on card back
171b John MacLeod C COR – No NBA logo on his photo on back
Market: The error version of this card is considered more rare and thus more valuable.

269a Bernie Bickerstaff C SP ERR – Says he was born on 2/11/44 on card back.
269b Bernie Bickerstaff C COR – Corrected date of birth 11/2/43 on back.
Market: The error version of this card is considered more rare and thus more valuable.

279a Orlando Woolridge SP ERR – On card back – ‘TM’ is not under Lakers Logo
279b Orlando Woolridge COR – The trademark ‘TM’ is under Lakers Logo
Market: The error version of this card is considered more rare and thus more valuable.

284a James Edwards ERR – There is a small black line to the left of the card number on back
284b James Edwards COR – No Line on back
Market: It’s believed both have about equal print runs.

Short Print (Sp) Cards – these cards are not that rare at all. To produce a series 2, Hoops needed to drop some cards from the actual sheets they printed the cards on to make room for the additional cards in the second series. Typically these cards have no additional value compared to other cards in the set.

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